Riding Tips

In this section I have managed to dig out some rather good You Tube links on basic riding tips. None of my own work but thanks to those that have bothered to put this out there. Have a look at them and I hope it helps you in sharpening your technique.

Thanks to Roadcraft Nottingham for putting all this together

General Positioning on the road and some common mistakes highlighted

This video is really quite handy, giving some great advice on riding on the road, what to look out for and what to anticipate

The Vanishing or Visual  Point or Road Limit

One of my favourites as I use this a lot myself. some basic information that can easily be put into practice and very useful when approaching and negotiating bends.

Riding in the Rain

This is also a good one especially when we are in the UK. Although on the BMW GS later models you can select the "rain" mode it also helps to employ some basic skills and common sense.

Braking with Anticipation

Again a lot of common sense but I like the way these guys run you through the basics

How to Ride with a pillion passenger

Something that I don't do myself simply because no-one wants to go on the back with me but frankly it does require a degree of skill. this video shows you how. 

The Art of Filtering

Another great little video on the art of filtering. How often have I decided not to do it as I am simply too scared of getting bumped off or worse hitting a car with my panniers. this is really quite useful.

Motorcycle Security Tips

I found this brief explanation very useful. There has been a huge increase in bike thefts over the past years especially the Adventure models that can easily be stripped for parts. Have a look and see if its useful. 

Advanced Riding - Positioning

A very good follow up video to the one above but with a bit more advanced detail on how to position yourself on the road. 

Quick Tips - how to anticipate junctions

Actually quite an important part of riding as most incidents occur at junctions where drivers fail to spot the motorbike and the inevitable T bone crash can occur.  

How to and When to change Gear 

Although maybe quite obvious but actually it depends very much on what you ride. I found it quite an interesting video.  

Quick Tips - how to lift your heavy GSA from its side stand

Actually I have found it a struggle when my bike is fully laden. Also the wrenching action that you have to do to physically lift the bike off its side stand, particularly if the camber is against you, is quite damaging to your lower back. The strain on the muscles is a very unnatural movement and unless you have a strong lower back you'll find very quickly something  will go wrong. 

So I was quite please to find the short film below which showed a simple but effective tip on how to minimise this force and get your bike in the upright position with the minimum of effort.  

whats new.jpg
garminbasecamplogo.jpg
theadventures.png
logo.jpg